Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatrics. 2007 Oct;120(4):785-92.

Neurodevelopmental outcome in survivors of periventricular hemorrhagic infarction.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Periventricular hemorrhagic infarction is a serious complication of germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants. Our objective was to determine the neurodevelopmental and adaptive outcomes of periventricular hemorrhagic infarction survivors and identify early cranial ultrasound predictors of adverse outcome.

METHODS:

We retrospectively evaluated all cranial ultrasounds of 30 premature infants with periventricular hemorrhagic infarction and assigned a cranial ultrasound-based periventricular hemorrhagic infarction severity score (range: 0-3) on the basis of whether periventricular hemorrhagic infarction (1) involved > or = 2 territories, (2) was bilateral, or (3) caused midline shift. We then performed neuromotor, visual function, and developmental evaluations (Mullen Scales of Early Learning, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale). Developmental scores below 2 SD from the mean were defined as abnormal.

RESULTS:

Median adjusted age at evaluation was 30 months (range: 12-66 months). Eighteen subjects (60%) had abnormal muscle tone, and 7 (26%) had visual field defects. Developmental delays involved gross motor (22 [73%]), fine motor (17 [59%]), visual receptive (13 [46%]), expressive language (11 [38%]), and cognitive (14 [50%]) domains. Impairment in daily living and socialization was documented in 10 (33%) and 6 (20%) infants, respectively. Higher cranial ultrasound-based periventricular hemorrhagic infarction severity scores predicted microcephaly and abnormalities in gross motor, visual receptive, and cognitive function.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the current era, two thirds of periventricular hemorrhagic infarction survivors develop significant cognitive and/or motor abnormalities, whereas adaptive skills are relatively spared. Higher cranial ultrasound-based periventricular hemorrhagic infarction severity scores predict worse outcome in several modalities and may prove to be a valuable tool for prognostication.

Comment in

PMID:
17908766
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk