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Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2007 Sep-Oct;3(5):543-8; discussion 548.

Does gastric bypass alter alcohol metabolism?

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Morbid obesity is the leading public health crisis in the United States, with bariatric surgery as the only effective and enduring treatment for this disease. a concern has been raised, that, postoperatively, alcohol metabolism might be altered in gastric bypass patients. We hypothesized that alcohol metabolism in the postoperative gastric bypass patient would be altered.

METHODS:

Of 36 subjects, 17 control and 19 postgastric bypass subjects each consumed 5 oz of red wine. They underwent an alcohol breath analysis every 5 minutes. The outcomes recorded included symptoms, initial peak alcohol breath level, and the time for alcohol breath levels to normalize.

RESULTS:

The gastric bypass group was on average 10 years older and had a greater weight and body mass index than the control group. The average time after gastric bypass was 2 years, with an average body mass index loss of 18 kg/m(2) (51 kg/m(2) before versus 33 kg/m(2) after). The gastric bypass patients had a peak alcohol breath level of 0.08% and the controls had a level of 0.05%. The gastric bypass group needed, on average, 108 minutes to reach an alcohol breath level of 0; the control group reached this level after an average of 72 minutes. Both groups showed a similar postingestion symptom profile.

CONCLUSION:

In this study, alcohol metabolism was significantly different between the postgastric bypass and control subjects. Although the gastric bypass patients' had a greater peak alcohol level and a longer time for the alcohol level to reach 0 than the controls, the gastric bypass group did not experience more symptoms than the control group. These findings provide caution regarding alcohol use by gastric bypass patients.

PMID:
17903777
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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