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Laryngoscope. 2007 Dec;117(12):2218-28.

Association of extraesophageal reflux disease and sinonasal symptoms: prevalence and impact on quality of life.

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  • 1Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792-7375, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of extraesophageal reflux disease symptoms and their association with sinonasal disorders within a general sample of adults in our community and to determine how these conditions affect perception of general health, sinus-related quality of life (QOL), and perception of reflux and digestive function.

STUDY DESIGN/METHODS:

A community-dwelling sample of 1,878 adults completed symptom and QOL surveys in a two-stage prospective design: an initial screening questionnaire (n = 1,878) and disease-specific (sinus and reflux/digestion) and general health-related QOL instruments (n = 1,073). Demographic and response data were summarized and analyzed for prevalence and correlations among data sets.

RESULTS:

Sinonasal symptoms were reported in 71% of subjects who completed the initial screening questionnaire, and reflux-related symptoms were reported by 59% of respondents. The co-occurrence of sinonasal and reflux symptoms was reported by 45% of respondents. Subjects with both sinonasal and reflux symptoms scored significantly worse on the disease-specific and general physical and mental QOL scales than subjects with only reflux or sinonasal symptoms or no symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

Symptoms associated with inflammatory sinonasal disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease are common in the general U.S. adult population and co-occur in the same individuals to a greater degree than can be attributed to chance alone. Co-occurrence was found to be associated with significant declines in both disease-specific and general physical and mental QOL. This finding has implications with regard to pathogenesis and treatment of these disorders.

PMID:
17891051
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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