Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Immunol Rev. 2007 Oct;219:88-102.

How human neutrophils kill and degrade microbes: an integrated view.

Author information

  • 1Inflammation Program, Department of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52241, USA. william-nauseef@uiowa.edu

Abstract

Neutrophils constitute the dominant cell in the circulation that mediates the earliest innate immune human responses to infection. The morbidity and mortality from infection rise dramatically in patients with quantitative or qualitative neutrophil defects, providing clinical confirmation of the important role of normal neutrophils for human health. Neutrophil-dependent anti-microbial activity against ingested microbes represents the collaboration of multiple agents, including those prefabricated during granulocyte development in the bone marrow and those generated de novo following neutrophil activation. Furthermore, neutrophils cooperate with extracellular agents as well as other immune cells to optimally kill and degrade invading microbes. This brief review focuses attention on two examples of the integrated nature of neutrophil-mediated anti-microbial action within the phagosome. The importance and complexity of myeloperoxidase-mediated events illustrate a collaboration of anti-microbial responses that are endogenous to the neutrophil, whereas the synergy between the phagocyte NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase and plasma-derived group IIA phospholipase A(2) exemplifies the collective effects of the neutrophil with an exogenous factor to achieve degradation of ingested staphylococci.

PMID:
17850484
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk