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Br J Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;191:218-23.

Genetic risk of depression and stress-induced negative affect in daily life.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, Vijverdalseweg 1, Concorde Building, Maastricht, The Netherlands. m.wichers@sp.unimaas.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A bias to develop negative affect in response to daily life stressors may be an important depression endophenotype, but remains difficult to assess.

AIMS:

To assess this mood bias endophenotype, uncontaminated by current mood, in the course of daily life.

METHOD:

The experience sampling method was used to collect multiple appraisals of daily life event-related stress and negative affect in 279 female twin pairs. Cross-twin, cross-trait associations between dailylife mood bias and DSM-IV depression were conducted.

RESULTS:

Probands whose co-twins were diagnosed with lifetime depression showed a stronger mood bias to stress than those with co-twins without such a diagnosis, independent of probands' current depressive symptoms and to a greater extent in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins.

CONCLUSIONS:

Genetic liability to depression is in part expressed as the tendency to display negative affect in response to minor stressors in daily life. This trait may represent a true depression endophenotype.

PMID:
17766761
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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