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J Hosp Infect. 2007 Sep;67(1):30-4. Epub 2007 Aug 27.

Bloodstream infection related to catheter connections: a prospective trial of two connection systems.

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  • 1Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain.

Abstract

Bloodstream infections (BSIs) related to central venous catheters (CVCs) and arterial catheters (ACs) are an increasing problem in the management of critically ill patients. Our objective was to assess the efficacy of a needle-free valve connection system (SmartSite), Alaris Medical Systems, San Diego, CA, USA) in the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). Patients admitted to an intensive care unit were prospectively assigned to have a CVC and AC connected with either a needle-free valve connection system (NFVCS) or a three-way stopcock connection (3WSC). The characteristics of the patients were similar in the two groups. Before manipulation, the NFVCS was disinfected with chlorhexidine digluconate 0.5% alcoholic solution. The 3WSC was not disinfected between use but it was covered with a protection cap. A total of 799 patients requiring the insertion of a multilumen CVC or AC for >48h from 1 April 2002 to 31 December 2003 were included. CR-BSI rates were 4.61 per 1000 days of catheter use in the disinfected NFVCS group and 4.11 per 1000 days of catheter use in the 3WSC group (P=0.59). When CVC-BSIs and AC-BSIs were analysed separately, the rate of CVC-BSI was 4.26 per 1000 days of catheter use in the NFVCS group, compared with 5.27 in the 3WSC group (P=0.4). The incidence rate of AC-BSI was 5.00 per 1000 days of catheter use in the NFVCS group, compared with 2.83 in the 3WSC group (P=0.08). The use of NFVCS does not reduce the incidence of catheter-related bacteraemia. The arterial catheter (AC) is a significant source of infection in critically ill patients.

PMID:
17719682
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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