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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Aug;15(8):2135-44.

Fatness, fitness, and insulin sensitivity among 7- to 9-year-old children.

Author information

  • 1Department of Health and Human Perofrmance, Iowa State University, 255 Forker, Ames, IA 50011, USA. jce@iastate.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among fatness and aerobic fitness on indices of insulin resistance and sensitivity in children.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

A total of 375 children (193 girls and 182 boys) 7 to 9 years of age were categorized by weight as normal-weight, overweight, or obese and by aerobic fitness based on a submaximal physical working capacity test (PWC). Fasting blood glucose (GLU) and insulin (INS) were used to calculate various indices of insulin sensitivity (GLU/INS), the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). Surrogate measures of pancreatic beta cell function included the insulinogenic index (INS/GLU) and the HOMA estimate of pancreatic beta-cell function (HOMA %B).

RESULTS:

Insulin sensitivity and secretion variables were significantly different between the normal-weight children and the overweight and obese subjects. Fasting insulin (FI), HOMA, QUICKI, and INS/GLU were significantly different between the overweight and obese subjects. Likewise, the high fitness group possessed a better insulin sensitivity profile. In general, the normal-weight-high fit group possessed the best insulin sensitivity profile and the obese-unfit group possessed the worst insulin sensitivity profile. Several significant differences existed among the six fat-fit groups. Of particular note are the differences within BMI groups by fitness level and the comparison of values between the normal-weight-unfit subjects and the overweight and obese subjects with high fitness.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate that aerobic fitness attenuates the difference in insulin sensitivity within BMI categories, thus emphasizing the role of fitness even among overweight and obese children.

PMID:
17712133
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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