Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug 28;13(32):4321-7.

Syndrome differentiation in traditional Chinese medicine and E-cadherin/ICAM-1 gene protein expression in gastric carcinoma.

Author information

  • 1Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital to Second Military Medical University, 415 fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003, China.

Abstract

AIM:

To explore the syndrome differentiation in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and gene protein expression in gastric carcinoma.

METHODS:

Preoperative data of gastric cancer cases were collected from the General Surgery Department and classified according to the criteria for syndrome differentiation in TCM. E-cadherin (E-cad) and ICAM-1 gene protein expressions were detected in postoperative specimens from these cases by the immunohistochemical EnVision two-step method.

RESULTS:

The E-cad positive expression rate was 90% in 100 cases of gastric carcinoma. The difference in E-cad expression was significant between the different syndrome differentiation types in TCM (P < 0.01). Further group-group comparison showed that there was a significant difference in E-cad expression between the stagnation of phlegm-damp type and the deficiency in both qi and blood and the deficiency-cold of stomach and spleen types, where E-cad expression was high. There was no significant difference between the internal obstruction of stagnant toxin type and the in-coordination between liver and stomach type, where E-cad expression was relatively low. The ICAM-1 positive expression rate was 58%, and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (c2 = 8.999, P > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

E-cad expression is relatively low in the internal obstruction of stagnant toxin type and the in-coordination between liver and stomach type, where tumor development and metastasis may be associated with low E-cad expression, or with low homogeneous adhesiveness between tumor cells.

PMID:
17708604
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk