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J Strength Cond Res. 2007 Aug;21(3):784-7.

The acute effects of combined static and dynamic stretch protocols on fifty-meter sprint performance in track-and-field athletes.

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  • 1Exercise Physiology Laboratory, University of Luton, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom. i.fletcher@herts.ac.uk

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of manipulating the static and dynamic stretch components associated with a traditional track-and-field warm-up. Eighteen experienced sprinters were randomly assigned in a repeated-measures, within-subject design study with 3 interventions: active dynamic stretch (ADS), static passive stretch combined with ADS (SADS), and static dynamic stretch combined with ADS (DADS). A standardized 800-m jogged warm-up was performed before each different stretch intervention, followed by two 50-m sprints. Results indicated that the SADS intervention yielded significantly (p < or = 0.05) slower 50-m sprint times then either the ADS or DADS intervention. The decrease in sprint time observed after the ADS intervention compared to the DADS intervention was found to be nonsignificant (p > 0.05). The decrease in performance post-SADS intervention was attributed to a decrease in the musculotendinous unit (MTU) stiffness, possibly due to a reduction in muscle activation prior to ground contact, leading to a decrease in the MTU's ability to store and transfer elastic energy after the use of passive static stretch techniques. The improved 50-m sprint performance associated with the ADS and DADS interventions was linked to the rehearsal of specific movement patterns, helping proprioception and preactivation, allowing a more optimum switch from eccentric to concentric muscle contraction. It was concluded that passive static stretching in a warm-up decreases sprint performance, despite being combined with dynamic stretches, when compared to a solely dynamic stretch approach.

PMID:
17685686
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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