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Gastroenterology. 2007 Aug;133(2):517-28. Epub 2007 May 3.

Induction of ovalbumin-specific tolerance by oral administration of Lactococcus lactis secreting ovalbumin.

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  • 1Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Obtaining antigen-specific immune suppression is an important goal in developing treatments of autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic gastrointestinal diseases. Oral tolerance is a powerful means for inducing tolerance to a particular antigen, but implementing this strategy in humans has been difficult. Active delivery of recombinant autoantigens or allergens at the intestinal mucosa by genetically modified Lactococcus lactis (L lactis) provides a novel therapeutic approach for inducing tolerance.

METHODS:

We engineered the food grade bacterium L lactis to secrete ovalbumin (OVA) and evaluated its ability to induce OVA-specific tolerance in OVA T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice (DO11.10). Tolerance induction was assessed by analysis of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, measurement of cytokines and OVA-specific proliferation, phenotypic analysis, and adoptive transfer experiments.

RESULTS:

Intragastric administration of OVA-secreting L lactis led to active delivery of OVA at the mucosa and suppression of local and systemic OVA-specific T-cell responses in DO11.10 mice. This suppression was mediated by induction of CD4(+)CD25(-) regulatory T cells that function through a transforming growth factor beta-dependent mechanism. Restimulation of splenocytes and gut-associated lymph node tissue from these mice resulted in a significant OVA-specific decrease in interferon gamma and a significant increase in interleukin-10 production. Furthermore, Foxp3 and CTLA-4 were significantly up-regulated in the CD4(+)CD25(-) population.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mucosal antigen delivery by oral administration of genetically engineered L lactis leads to antigen-specific tolerance. This approach can be used to develop effective therapeutics for systemic and intestinal immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

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PMID:
17681173
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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