Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Microbiol. 2007 Sep;55(3):260-5. Epub 2007 Jul 25.

Probiotic strains and their combination inhibit in vitro adhesion of pathogens to pig intestinal mucosa.

Author information

  • 1Functional Foods Forum, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. marcol@utu.fi

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the protective effect of commercial probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG) alone and in combination on the adhesion of pathogenic strains as Salmonella, Clostridium, and Escherichia coli to pig intestinal mucus obtained from different intestinal regions. In combination, probiotic strains enhanced each other's adhesion, mainly in large intestinal mucus. Treatment of intestinal mucus with Bb12 and LGG, alone or in combination, significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the adhesion of the tested pathogens. The ability to inhibit pathogen adhesion appears to depend on the specific probiotics and pathogens and on the mucosal site. B. lactis Bb12 and L. rhamnosus LGG in combination revealed a better ability to inhibit adhesion of all pathogens tested to pig intestinal mucus than probiotic strains. Probiotic combinations could be useful for counteracting disease-associated aberrations in intestinal microbiota. Specific protective probiotics could be selected for particular pig pathogens. Probiotic strains from human origin and intended for human use also adhere to pig intestinal mucus and are able to displace and inhibit pathogens.

PMID:
17657533
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk