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MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Jul 27;56(29):733-7.

Nonfatal traumatic brain injuries from sports and recreation activities--United States, 2001-2005.

Abstract

Each year in the United States, an estimated 38 million children and adolescents participate in organized sports, and approximately 170 million adults participate in some type of physical activity not related to work. The health benefits of these activities are tempered by the risk for injury, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). CDC estimates that 1.1 million persons with TBIs are treated and released from U.S. hospital emergency departments (EDs) each year, and an additional 235,000 are hospitalized for these injuries. TBIs can result in long-term, negative health effects (e.g., memory loss and behavioral changes). To characterize sports- and recreation-related (SR-related) TBIs among patients treated in U.S. hospital EDs, CDC analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System--All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) for the period 2001-2005. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that an estimated 207,830 patients with nonfatal SR-related TBIs were treated in EDs each year during this period. The highest rates of SR-related TBI ED visits for both males and females occurred among those aged 10-14 years. Increased awareness of TBI risks, prevention strategies, and the importance of timely identification and management is essential for reducing the incidence, severity, and long-term negative health effects of this type of injury.

PMID:
17657206
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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