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Radiology. 2007 Aug;244(2):356-78.

The current status of breast MR imaging. Part I. Choice of technique, image interpretation, diagnostic accuracy, and transfer to clinical practice.

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  • 1Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, D-53105 Bonn, Germany.

Abstract

Compared with mammography and breast ultrasonography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a breast imaging technique that offers not only information on lesion cross-sectional morphology but also on functional lesion features such as tissue perfusion and enhancement kinetics. After an enthusiastic start to clinical breast MR imaging in the early 1990s, a variety of difficulties and obstacles were identified that hampered the transfer of the modality into clinical practice, including a lack of standardization regarding image acquisition and interpretation guidelines, a lack of MR-compatible interventional materials, and a lack of evidence regarding its diagnostic accuracy--particularly specificity and positive predictive value, as well as sensitivity for ductal carcinoma in situ. This article is the first of two on the current status of breast MR imaging. The pathophysiologic basis of breast MR and the effects on acquisition technique and diagnostic accuracy, the diverging demands of high spatial and temporal resolution, and the different approaches that exist for image acquisition are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of different pulse sequence parameters are discussed to help radiologists make a balanced and informed decision regarding choice of image acquisition protocol. Imaging findings in common benign and malignant changes are described, and current concepts for differential diagnosis, including the MR Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon, are discussed. Furthermore, obstacles that impeded the technique's transfer into clinical practice are discussed, and the progress made in recent years, especially regarding the development of guidelines, procedural standardization, and MR-guided interventions are outlined.

PMID:
17641361
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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