Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Mol Ther. 2007 Oct;15(10):1782-8. Epub 2007 Jul 17.

Timing of therapeutic intervention determines functional and survival outcomes in a mouse model of late infantile batten disease.

Author information

  • 1Genzyme Corporation, Framingham, Massachusetts 01701, USA.


Classical late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (cLINCL) is a monogenic disorder caused by the loss of tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) activity as a result of mutations in CLN2. Absence of TPP1 results in lysosomal storage with an accompanying axonal degeneration throughout the central nervous system (CNS), which leads to progressive neurodegeneration and early death. In this study, we compared the efficacies of pre- and post-symptomatic injections of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) for treating the cellular and functional abnormalities of CLN2 mutant mice. Intracranial injection of AAV1-hCLN2 resulted in widespread human TPP1 (hTPP1) activity in the brain that was 10-100-fold above wild-type levels. Injections before disease onset prevented storage and spared neurons from axonal degeneration, reflected by the preservation of motor function. Furthermore, the majority of CLN2 mutant mice treated pre-symptomatically lived for at least 330 days, compared with a median survival of 151 days in untreated CLN2 mutant controls. In contrast, although injection after disease onset ameliorated lysosomal storage, there was evidence of axonal degeneration, motor function showed limited recovery, and the animals had a median lifespan of 216 days. These data illustrate the importance of early intervention for enhanced therapeutic benefit, which may provide guidance in designing novel treatment strategies for cLINCL patients.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk