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Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;86(1):100-6.

Independent associations of insulin resistance with high whole-body intermuscular and low leg subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution in obese HIV-infected women.

Author information

  • 1Endocrine, Diabetes and Nutrition Division, the New York Obesity Research Center, St Luke's Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10025, USA. jba1@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity and insulin resistance are growing problems in HIV-positive (HIV+) women receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to determine the contribution of adipose tissue (AT) enlargement and distribution to the presence of insulin resistance in obese HIV+ women.

DESIGN:

Whole-body intermuscular AT (IMAT), visceral AT (VAT), subcutaneous AT (SAT), and SAT distribution (leg versus upper body) were measured by whole-body magnetic resonance imaging. Insulin sensitivity (S(I)) was measured with an intravenous glucose tolerance test in obese HIV+ women recruited because of their desire to lose weight (n=17) and in obese healthy controls (n=32).

RESULTS:

The HIV+ women had relatively less whole-body SAT and more VAT and IMAT than did the controls (P<0.05 for all). A significant interaction by HIV status was observed for the relation of total SAT with S(I) (P<0.001 for the regression's slope interactions after adjustment for age, height, and weight). However, relations of IMAT, VAT, and SAT distribution (leg SAT as a percentage of total SAT; leg SAT%) with S(I) did not differ significantly between groups. For both groups combined, the best model predicting a low S(I) included significant contributions by both high IMAT and low leg SAT%, independent of age, height, and weight, and no interaction between groups was observed (overall r(2)=0.44, P=0.0003).

CONCLUSION:

In obese HIV+ women, high whole-body IMAT and low leg SAT% distribution are independently associated with insulin resistance.

PMID:
17616768
PMCID:
PMC2670485
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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