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J Exp Med. 2007 Jul 9;204(7):1691-702. Epub 2007 Jul 2.

Differential engagement of Tim-1 during activation can positively or negatively costimulate T cell expansion and effector function.

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  • 1Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

It has been suggested that T cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim)-1 expressed on T cells serves to positively costimulate T cell responses. However, crosslinking of Tim-1 by its ligand Tim-4 resulted in either activation or inhibition of T cell responses, thus raising the issue of whether Tim-1 can have a dual function as a costimulator. To resolve this issue, we tested a series of monoclonal antibodies specific for Tim-1 and identified two antibodies that showed opposite functional effects. One anti-Tim-1 antibody increased the frequency of antigen-specific T cells, the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma and IL-17, and the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In contrast, another anti-Tim-1 antibody inhibited the generation of antigen-specific T cells, production of IFN-gamma and IL-17, and development of autoimmunity, and it caused a strong Th2 response. Both antibodies bound to closely related epitopes in the IgV domain of the Tim-1 molecule, but the activating antibody had an avidity for Tim-1 that was 17 times higher than the inhibitory antibody. Although both anti-Tim-1 antibodies induced CD3 capping, only the activating antibody caused strong cytoskeletal reorganization and motility. These data indicate that Tim-1 regulates T cell responses and that Tim-1 engagement can alter T cell function depending on the affinity/avidity with which it is engaged.

PMID:
17606630
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2118637
Free PMC Article
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