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Foot Ankle Int. 2007 Jun;28(6):715-23.

A randomized controlled trial of two types of in-shoe orthoses in children with flexible excess pronation of the feet.

Author information

  • 1University of South Australia, Spencer Gulf Rural Health School, Whyalla Norrie, Nicolson Avenue, South Australia 5608, Australia. dee.whitford@unisa.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Orthoses for children with flexible excess pronation are estimated to cost Australian parents millions of dollars per year; however, there is no high-level evidence that orthoses improve function or reduce pain.

METHODS:

A randomized parallel, single-blinded, controlled trial of custom-made and ready-made orthoses was conducted in children between the ages of 7 and 11 years with bilateral flexible excess pronation. The diagnosis was based on calcaneal eversion and navicular drop. Outcomes included gross motor proficiency, self-perception, exercise efficiency, and pain. Measurements were taken at baseline, and at 3 and 12 months. Of the 178 children who participated at baseline, 160 continued to the end of the trial.

RESULTS:

After randomization, baseline characteristics were similar between the three treatment groups (custom-made, ready-made, and control). Statistical modeling demonstrated that although for most outcome measures there were statistically significant trends over time, none of the group comparisons were statistically significant. A sub-group analysis of those presenting with pain found no significant differences at 3 or 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study found no evidence to justify the use of in-shoe orthoses in the management of flexible excess foot pronation in children.

PMID:
17592702
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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