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Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Jul;31(7):1061-7. Epub 2007 Feb 20.

Dietary energy density increases during early childhood irrespective of familial predisposition to obesity: results from a prospective cohort study.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. tkral@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study compared 4-year changes in daily energy density (ED; kcal/g) in children born at different risk for obesity, characterized the stability of ED and examined associations between ED and child body composition.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study to measure habitual dietary ED of children who are born at different risk for obesity.

SUBJECTS:

Children who were born at high risk (n=22) or low risk (n=27) for obesity based on maternal pre-pregnancy weight.

MEASUREMENTS:

Three-day food records were collected from children's mothers at child ages 3, 4, 5 and 6 years. Three categories of ED were computed (food only, food and milk, and food and all beverages) and body composition assessed at each year.

RESULTS:

The mean (+/-s.e.m.) ED increased over time across all children (linear trend: P<0.003): 2.18+/-0.07 to 2.32+/-0.06 kcal/g (food only); 1.66+/-0.07 to 1.82+/-0.06 kcal/g (food and milk); and 1.24+/-0.04 to 1.37+/-0.05 kcal/g (food and all beverages). Intraindividual coefficients of variation were smaller than those previously reported for adults. Weight indices were not correlated with dietary ED (P>0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Dietary ED increased in young children, irrespective of their predisposition to obesity, between the ages of 3 and 6 years. The genes that promote childhood obesity may not exert their influence through dietary ED, which may be more strongly influenced by environmental factors.

PMID:
17589540
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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