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Plant J. 2007 Aug;51(4):656-69. Epub 2007 Jun 21.

Heterotrimeric G-protein complex and G-protein-coupled receptor from a legume (Pisum sativum): role in salinity and heat stress and cross-talk with phospholipase C.

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  • 1Plant Molecular Biology Group, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi - 67, India.

Abstract

Heterotrimeric G-proteins transduce signals from activated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) to appropriate downstream effectors and thereby play an important role in signaling. A role of G-proteins in salinity and heat stress tolerance has not heretofore been described. We report isolation of cDNAs of two isoforms of Galpha (Galpha1, 1152 bp; Galpha2, 1152 bp), one Gbeta (1134 bp), two isoforms of Ggamma (Ggamma1, 345 bp; Ggamma2, 303 bp) and a GPCR (1008 bp) from Pisum sativum, and purification of all the encoded recombinant proteins (Galpha, 44 kDa; Gbeta, 41 kDa; Ggamma, 14 kDa; GPCR, 35 kDa). The transcript levels of Galpha and Gbeta were upregulated following NaCl, heat and H(2)O(2) treatments. Protein-protein interaction studies using an in vitro yeast two-hybrid system and in planta co-immunoprecipitation showed that the Galpha subunit interacted with the pea Gbeta subunit and pea phospholipase C (PLCdelta) at the calcium-binding domain (fn1). The GTPase activity of the Galpha subunit increased after interaction with PLCdelta. The GPCR protein interacted with all the subunits of G-proteins and with itself. Transgenic tobacco plants (T(0) and T(1)) constitutively over-expressing Galpha showed tolerance to salinity and heat, while Gbeta-over-expressing plants showed only heat tolerance, as tested by leaf disk senescence assay and germination/growth of T(1) seeds/seedlings. These findings provide direct evidence for a novel role of Galpha and Gbeta subunits in abiotic stress tolerance and possible cross-talk between PLC- and G-protein-mediated signaling pathways.

PMID:
17587233
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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