Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Adolesc Health. 2007 Jul;41(1):77-83. Epub 2007 Apr 12.

Factors correlated with violent video game use by adolescent boys and girls.

Author information

  • 1Harvard Medical School Center for Mental Health and Media in the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Psychiatry, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ckolson@partners.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the video and computer game play patterns of young adolescent boys and girls, including factors correlated with playing violent games.

METHODS:

Data collected in November/December, 2004 from children in grades 7 and 8 at two demographically diverse schools in Pennsylvania and South Carolina, using a detailed written self-reported survey.

RESULTS:

Of 1254 participants (53% female, 47% male), only 80 reported playing no electronic games in the previous 6 months. Of 1126 children who listed frequently played game titles, almost half (48.8%) played at least one violent (mature-rated) game regularly (67.9% of boys and 29.2% of girls). One third of boys and 10.7% of girls play games nearly every day; only 1 in 20 plays often or always with a parent. Playing M-rated games is positively correlated (p < .001) with being male, frequent game play, playing with strangers over the Internet, having a game system and computer in one's bedroom, and using games to manage anger.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most young adolescent boys and many girls routinely play M-rated games. Implications for identifying atypical and potentially harmful patterns of electronic game use are discussed, as well as the need for greater media literacy among parents.

PMID:
17577537
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk