Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Jun 19;104(25):10595-600. Epub 2007 Jun 13.

IGF binding protein-3 regulates hematopoietic stem cell and endothelial precursor cell function during vascular development.

Author information

  • 1Program in Stem Cell Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.

Abstract

We asked whether the hypoxia-regulated factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3), could modulate stem cell factor receptor (c-kit+), stem cell antigen-1 (sca-1+), hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), or CD34+ endothelial precursor cell (EPC) function. Exposure of CD34+ EPCs to IGFBP3 resulted in rapid differentiation into endothelial cells and dose-dependent increases in cell migration and capillary tube formation. IGFBP3-expressing plasmid was injected into the vitreous of neonatal mice undergoing the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. In separate studies, GFP-expressing HSCs were transfected with IGFBP3 plasmid and injected into the vitreous of OIR mice. Administering either IGFBP3 plasmid alone or HSCs transfected with the plasmid resulted in a similar reduction in areas of vasoobliteration, protection of the developing vasculature from hyperoxia-induced regression, and reduction in preretinal neovascularization compared to control plasmid or HSCs transfected with control plasmid. In conclusion, IGFBP3 mediates EPC migration, differentiation, and capillary formation in vitro. Targeted expression of IGFBP3 protects the vasculature from damage and promotes proper vascular repair after hyperoxic insult in the OIR model. IGFBP3 expression may represent a physiological adaptation to ischemia and potentially a therapeutic target for treatment of ischemic conditions.

PMID:
17567755
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1965558
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (5)Free text

Fig. 1.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 4.
Fig. 5.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk