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Circulation. 2007 Jul 3;116(1):67-76. Epub 2007 Jun 11.

Emergency department physician activation of the catheterization laboratory and immediate transfer to an immediately available catheterization laboratory reduce door-to-balloon time in ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

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  • 1Indiana Heart Physicians/St. Francis Heart Center, 5330 E Stop 11 Rd, Indianapolis, IN 46237, USA. khot@cvresearch.net

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Consensus guidelines and hospital quality-of-care programs recommend that ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients achieve a door-to-balloon time of < or = 90 minutes. However, there are limited prospective data on specific measures to significantly reduce door-to-balloon time.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We prospectively determined the impact on median door-to-balloon time of a protocol mandating (1) emergency department physician activation of the catheterization laboratory and (2) immediate transfer of the patient to an immediately available catheterization laboratory by an in-house transfer team consisting of an emergency department nurse, a critical care unit nurse, and a chest pain unit nurse. We collected door-to-balloon time for 60 consecutive ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing emergency percutaneous intervention within 24 hours of presentation from October 1, 2004, through August 31, 2005, and compared this group with 86 consecutive ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients from September 1, 2005, through June 26, 2006, after protocol implementation. Median door-to-balloon time decreased overall (113.5 versus 75.5 minutes; P<0.0001), during regular hours (83.5 versus 64.5 minutes; P=0.005), during off-hours (123.5 versus 77.5 minutes; P<0.0001), and with transfer from an outside affiliated emergency department (147 versus 85 minutes; P=0.0006). Treatment within 90 minutes increased from 28% to 71% (P<0.0001). Mean infarct size decreased (peak creatinine kinase, 2623+/-3329 versus 1517+/-1556 IU/L; P=0.0089), as did hospital length of stay (5+/-7 versus 3+/-2 days; P=0.0097) and total hospital costs per admission ($26,826+/-29,497 versus $18,280+/-8943; P=0.0125).

CONCLUSIONS:

Emergency department physician activation of the catheterization laboratory and immediate transfer of the patient to an immediately available catheterization laboratory reduce door-to-balloon time, leading to a reduction in myocardial infarct size, hospital length of stay, and total hospital costs.

PMID:
17562960
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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