Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jun;85(6):1486-94.

The solid fat content of stearic acid-rich fats determines their postprandial effects.

Author information

  • 1Nutritional Sciences Research Division, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. sarah.e.berry@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The process of randomization is used commercially to harden fats as an alternative to partial hydrogenation, but its effects on cardiovascular disease risk factors are uncertain.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to compare the chronic and acute effects of randomization of a fat rich in 1,3-distearyl, 2-oleyl glycerol on fasting and postprandial lipids, glucose, insulin, and activated clotting factor VII (FVIIa) concentrations.

DESIGN:

A crossover design study in 16 men compared fasting and postprandial lipid, glucose, insulin, and FVIIa concentrations at baseline and after a 3-wk diet providing 30 g unrandomized or randomized shea butter and sunflower oil blends (SSOBs), both of which contained approximately 50% stearic acid. Fecal fat excretion was measured during each dietary period. Postprandial changes were assessed after the consumption of meals providing 50 g test fat. A subsequent study compared postprandial changes after the consumption of an oleic acid-rich sunflower oil meal and an unrandomized SSOB meal.

RESULTS:

Both SSOBs were well digested and absorbed. Randomization did not affect fasting or postprandial lipid, glucose, insulin, or FVIIa concentrations. Compared with the oleic acid-rich meal, the unrandomized SSOB resulted in 53% lower postprandial lipemia, 23% higher hepatic lipase activity, and a 25% lower postprandial increase in FVIIa concentration. The solid fat contents at 37 degrees C were 22%, 41%, and 0% with the unrandomized SSOB, randomized SSOB, and oleic acid-rich meals, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Stearic acid-rich triacylglycerol in both unrandomized and randomized forms does not adversely affect lipid risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The high proportion of solid fat at 37 degrees C may explain the decreased postprandial lipemic response.

PMID:
17556683
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk