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Nature. 2007 Jun 7;447(7145):661-78.

Genome-wide association study of 14,000 cases of seven common diseases and 3,000 shared controls.

Collaborators (258)

Burton PR, Clayton DG, Cardon LR, Craddock N, Deloukas P, Duncanson A, Kwiatkowski DP, McCarthy MI, Ouwehand WH, Samani NJ, Todd JA, Donnelly P, Barrett JC, Burton PR, Davison D, Donnelly P, Easton D, Evans D, Leung HT, Marchini JL, Morris AP, Spencer CC, Tobin MD, Cardon LR, Clayton DG, Attwood AP, Boorman JP, Cant B, Everson U, Hussey JM, Jolley JD, Knight AS, Koch K, Meech E, Nutland S, Prowse CV, Stevens HE, Taylor NC, Walters GR, Walker NM, Watkins NA, Winzer T, Todd JA, Ouwehand WH, Jones RW, McArdle WL, Ring SM, Strachan DP, Pembrey M, Breen G, St Clair D, Caesar S, Gordon-Smith K, Jones L, Fraser C, Green EK, Grozeva D, Hamshere ML, Holmans PA, Jones IR, Kirov G, Moskvina V, Nikolov I, O'Donovan MC, Owen MJ, Craddock N, Collier DA, Elkin A, Farmer A, Williamson R, McGuffin P, Young AH, Ferrier IN, Ball SG, Balmforth AJ, Barrett JH, Bishop DT, Iles MM, Maqbool A, Yuldasheva N, Hall AS, Braund PS, Burton PR, Dixon RJ, Mangino M, Suzanne S, Tobin MD, Thompson JR, Samani NJ, Bredin F, Tremelling M, Parkes M, Drummond H, Lees CW, Nimmo ER, Satsangi J, Fisher SA, Forbes A, Lewis CM, Onnie CM, Prescott NJ, Sanderson J, Mathew CG, Barbour J, Mohiuddin MK, Todhunter CE, Mansfield JC, Ahmad T, Cummings FR, Jewell DP, Webster J, Brown MJ, Clayton DG, Lathrop GM, Connell J, Dominczak A, Samani NJ, Marcano CA, Burke B, Dobson R, Gungadoo J, Lee KL, Munroe PB, Newhouse SJ, Onipinla A, Wallace C, Xue M, Caulfield M, Farrall M, Barton A, Bruce IN, Donovan H, Eyre S, Gilbert PD, Hider SL, Hinks AM, John SL, Potter C, Silman AJ, Symmmons DP, Thomson W, Worthington J, Clayton DG, Dunger DB, Nutland S, Stevens HE, Walker NM, Widmer B, Todd JA, Frayling TA, Freathy RM, Lango H, Perry JR, Shields BM, Weedon MN, Hattersley AT, Hitman GA, Walker M, Elliott KS, Groves CJ, Lindgren CM, Rayner NW, Timpson NJ, Zeggini E, McCarthy MI, Newport M, Sirugo G, Lyons E, Vannberg F, Hill AV, Bradbury LA, Farrar C, Pointon JJ, Wordsworth P, Brown MA, Franklyn JA, Heward JM, Simmonds MJ, Gough SC, Seal S, Stratton MR, Rahman N, Ban M, Goris A, Sawcer SJ, Compston A, Conway D, Jallow M, Newport M, Sirugo G, Rockett KA, Kwiatowski DP, Bumpstead SJ, Chaney A, Downes K, Ghori MJ, Gwilliam R, Hunt SE, Inouye M, Keniry A, King E, McGinnis R, Potter S, Ravindrarajah R, Whittaker P, Widden C, Withers D, Deloukas P, Leung HT, Nutland S, Stevens HE, Walker NM, Todd JA, Easton D, Clayton DG, Burton PR, Tobin MD, Barrett JC, Evans D, Morris AP, Cardon LR, Cardin NJ, Davison D, Ferreira T, Pereira-Gale J, Hallgrimsdottir IB, Howie BN, Marchini JL, Spencer CC, Su Z, Teo YY, Vukcevic D, Donnelly P, Bentley D, Brown MA, Gordon LR, Caulfield M, Clayton DG, Compston A, Craddock N, Deloukas P, Donnelly P, Farrall M, Gough SC, Hall AS, Hattersley AT, Hill AV, Kwiatkowski DP, Mathew C, McCarthy MI, Ouwehand WH, Parkes M, Pembrey M, Rahman N, Samani NJ, Stratton MR, Todd JA, Worthington J.

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that genome-wide association (GWA) studies represent a powerful approach to the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. We describe a joint GWA study (using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500K Mapping Array Set) undertaken in the British population, which has examined approximately 2,000 individuals for each of 7 major diseases and a shared set of approximately 3,000 controls. Case-control comparisons identified 24 independent association signals at P < 5 x 10(-7): 1 in bipolar disorder, 1 in coronary artery disease, 9 in Crohn's disease, 3 in rheumatoid arthritis, 7 in type 1 diabetes and 3 in type 2 diabetes. On the basis of prior findings and replication studies thus-far completed, almost all of these signals reflect genuine susceptibility effects. We observed association at many previously identified loci, and found compelling evidence that some loci confer risk for more than one of the diseases studied. Across all diseases, we identified a large number of further signals (including 58 loci with single-point P values between 10(-5) and 5 x 10(-7)) likely to yield additional susceptibility loci. The importance of appropriately large samples was confirmed by the modest effect sizes observed at most loci identified. This study thus represents a thorough validation of the GWA approach. It has also demonstrated that careful use of a shared control group represents a safe and effective approach to GWA analyses of multiple disease phenotypes; has generated a genome-wide genotype database for future studies of common diseases in the British population; and shown that, provided individuals with non-European ancestry are excluded, the extent of population stratification in the British population is generally modest. Our findings offer new avenues for exploring the pathophysiology of these important disorders. We anticipate that our data, results and software, which will be widely available to other investigators, will provide a powerful resource for human genetics research.

Comment in

PMID:
17554300
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2719288
Free PMC Article

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