Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Matern Child Health J. 2008 Jan;12(1):112-8. Epub 2007 Jun 6.

The body mass index of teen mothers and their toddler children.

Author information

  • 1Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Benedict Building, A3-110, Worcester, MA, 01655, USA. celeste.lemay@umassmed.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate: change in Body Mass Index (BMI) of adolescent mothers (14-19 years of age) from pre-pregnancy to 36 months postpartum; BMI of their children age 2 or older; relationship between maternal BMI and children's BMI.

METHODS:

Retrospective medical record abstraction of adolescent mothers attending a medical program in Massachusetts between 2001 and 2005 who had self-reported pre-pregnancy BMI data at first prenatal visit, at least one BMI measure 12 or more months postpartum, and who did not experience a repeat pregnancy (n = 52). Children of adolescent mothers were included if they had received their 2 (n = 41) and/or 3 (n = 28) year physical.

RESULTS:

Adolescent mothers: overweight increased from 25% pre-pregnancy to 33% at 24-36 months postpartum; obesity more than doubled in the same time period, from 15% to 36%. Those with BMI data available pre-pregnancy and postpartum had an increase in mean BMI from 25 pre-pregnancy to 29 at 24-36 months postpartum (P < 0.001). Two-year-old children: About 5% were at risk for overweight and 12% were overweight. Three-year-old children: About 18% were at risk for overweight and 18% were overweight. When BMI categories of children were compared to BMI categories of their mothers, there was a trend for adolescent mothers with overweight/obesity at 24-36 months postpartum to have 3-year-old children at risk for overweight or overweight (P = 0.092).

CONCLUSIONS:

There was a significant increase in overweight/obesity in this cohort of adolescent mothers and their children followed 36 months postpartum. The long-term sequelae of overweight/obesity indicates a need for effective interventions.

PMID:
17551821
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk