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Am J Clin Oncol. 2007 Jun;30(3):310-4.

Stereotactic radiosurgical treatment of cerebral metastases arising from breast cancer.

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  • 1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as primary or salvage treatment of brain metastases arising from breast cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Between July 2000 and September 2005, the medical records of 49 breast cancer patients who underwent SRS for 84 brain metastases were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-four patients received SRS as primary brain metastasis treatment and 15 patients received SRS as salvage treatment of brain metastasis recurrence following prior whole-brain radiation therapy. The Kaplan-Meier method, univariate comparisons with log-rank test, and multivariate analysis were performed.

RESULTS:

Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 5-50 months) and median survival was 19 months for all patients. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 60%, 56%, and 55%, 23% for initial SRS alone and SRS salvage groups, respectively (P = 0.99). A multivariate analysis showed that a high KPS score (KPS > or =90 vs. <90; P = 0.02), a higher SIR value (SIR > or =6 vs. <6; P = 0.001), postmenopausal status (P = 0.003), and positive estrogen receptor status (P = 0.04) were predictive of better survival. The 1- and 2-year local control rates were 79%, 49%, and 77%, 46% for SRS alone and SRS salvage group, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

SRS can be used as primary treatment of brain metastases or salvage of recurrences after whole-brain radiation therapy to achieve good local control on the order of close to 80% at 1 year. The median survival of brain metastasis patients with breast cancer of 19 months appears favorable compared with the general brain metastasis population.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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