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Trauma Violence Abuse. 2007 Apr;8(2):199-213.

Screening for intimate partner violence in medical settings.

Author information

  • Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA.

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with negative health consequences. Universal screening for IPV offers many opportunities for successful intervention, yet this practice in medical settings is controversial. This article examines the potential impact of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for IPV screening and the emerging literature supporting measurable health benefits resulting from screening interventions in medical settings. Several screening tools and methods of administration that have been evaluated in various clinical settings, with goals to increase their sensitivity and to determine a best method of administration, are reviewed in this article. Mandatory reporting is closely linked to screening practices and may influence healthcare worker practice and patient disclosure. Mandatory reporting studies are lacking and show variable physician compliance, victim acceptance, and scant outcome data. Informed consent prior to screening, explaining the process of mandatory reporting statutes and victim options should be evaluated to increase sensitivity of screening tools.

PMID:
17545574
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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