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Pharm Res. 2007 Oct;24(10):1927-35. Epub 2007 May 31.

A protective allergy vaccine based on CpG- and protamine-containing PLGA microparticles.

Author information

  • 1Unit for Experimental Immunotherapy, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Gloriastrasse 31, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland.

Erratum in

  • Pharm Res. 2008 Mar;25(3):710.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) requires dozens of subcutaneous injections over 3 to 5 years in order to control IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, which is a T-helper 2 (Th2)-associated pathology. This study investigates the use of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles combined with immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG), as well as protamine in SIT.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We prepared microparticle formulations with the major allergen of bee venom, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and analyzed the effect of co-encapsulated or admixed CpG in both naïve and bee venom allergic mice.

RESULTS:

Mice immunized with microparticles containing only PLA2 induced weak antibody responses. In contrast, the combination with CpG resulted in strong PLA2-specific antibody responses. The presence of CpG was required for the induction of the Th1-associated isotype IgG2a, and the titers of IgG2a in sensitized mice correlated with a better protection against an allergen challenge. The effect of CpG was further strengthened when protamine was co-encapsulated for complexation of CpG.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study shows that allergen-specific immunotherapy with a PLGA-based allergen-delivery system in combination with CpG enhanced the induction of protective IgG2a immune responses. This may improve SIT compliance and shorten its duration.

PMID:
17541735
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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