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Br J Psychiatry. 2007 Jun;190:503-8.

Temperament, character and personality disorders as predictors of response to interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychological Medicine, Christchurch School of Medicine and Health Sciences, PO Box 4345, Christchurch, New Zealand. peter.joyce@chmeds.ac.nz

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy are widely accepted as effective treatments for major depression. There is little evidence on how personality disorder or personality traits affect treatment response.

AIMS:

To determine whether personality disorder or traits have an adverse impact on treatment response to interpersonal psychotherapy or cognitive-behavioural therapy in people receiving out-patient treatment for depression.

METHOD:

The study was a randomised trial in a university-based clinical research unit for out-patients with depression.

RESULTS:

Personality disorder did not adversely affect treatment response for patients with depression randomised to cognitive-behavioural therapy. Conversely, personality disorder did adversely affect treatment response for patients randomised to interpersonal psychotherapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite the two therapies having comparable efficacy in patients with depression, response to interpersonal psychotherapy (but not cognitive-behavioural therapy) is affected by personality traits. This could suggest the two therapies are indicated for different patients or that they work by different mechanisms.

PMID:
17541110
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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