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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 May 15;104 Suppl 1:8597-604. Epub 2007 May 9.

The frailty of adaptive hypotheses for the origins of organismal complexity.

Author information

  • Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. milynch@indiana.edu

Abstract

The vast majority of biologists engaged in evolutionary studies interpret virtually every aspect of biodiversity in adaptive terms. This narrow view of evolution has become untenable in light of recent observations from genomic sequencing and population-genetic theory. Numerous aspects of genomic architecture, gene structure, and developmental pathways are difficult to explain without invoking the nonadaptive forces of genetic drift and mutation. In addition, emergent biological features such as complexity, modularity, and evolvability, all of which are current targets of considerable speculation, may be nothing more than indirect by-products of processes operating at lower levels of organization. These issues are examined in the context of the view that the origins of many aspects of biological diversity, from gene-structural embellishments to novelties at the phenotypic level, have roots in nonadaptive processes, with the population-genetic environment imposing strong directionality on the paths that are open to evolutionary exploitation.

PMID:
17494740
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1876435
Free PMC Article

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