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J Neuroimmunol. 2007 Aug;188(1-2):13-21. Epub 2007 May 9.

CD8+ T cells directed against a viral peptide contribute to loss of motor function by disrupting axonal transport in a viral model of fulminant demyelination.

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  • 1Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. howe.charles@mayo.edu <howe.charles@mayo.edu>

Abstract

Demyelination, a pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis, may be a necessary but not a sufficient condition for motor dysfunction associated with this disease. We favor a neurodegenerative model of multiple sclerosis and suggest that demyelination creates a permissive environment wherein the denuded axon becomes susceptible to immune-mediated injury. Unfortunately, the cellular effectors responsible for eliciting such axonal injury are currently unknown. Based on previous observations implicating cytotoxic T cells in this injury, we assessed motor function, axon dropout, and axon injury following peptide depletion of the immunodominant CD8+ antiviral T cell response in the IFNgamma receptor-deficient mouse model of acute demyelination. We found that the targeted removal of this population of cytotoxic effector cells prior to infection with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus caused a substantial preservation of motor function at 45 days postinfection that was associated with preservation of retrograde axonal transport in a subpopulation of surviving axons within the spinal cord. We conclude that cytotoxic T cells may be responsible for the initiation of axon injury following demyelination.

PMID:
17493690
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1986839
Free PMC Article
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