Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Apr;68(4):546-57.

Can antidepressants be used to treat the schizophrenia prodrome? Results of a prospective, naturalistic treatment study of adolescents.

Author information

  • 1Recognition and Prevention (RAP) Program, Department of Psychiatry Research, The Zucker Hillside Hospital, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Glen Oaks, NY 11004, USA. cornblat@lij.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study reports the results of a prospective, naturalistic treatment study of adolescents considered to be in the prodromal (i.e., prepsychotic) phase of schizophrenia.

METHOD:

Forty-eight adolescents (mean age = 15.8 years) participating in the initial phase of the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) program (1998-2005) were included in the current report. Individuals were selected from the overall sample (N = 152) if they had: (1) displayed attenuated positive symptoms, (2) been treated pharmacologically for at least 8 weeks, and (3) been followed up for at least 6 months (mean follow-up = 30.5 months).

RESULTS:

Two types of medication were naturalistically prescribed: antidepressants (N = 20) or second-generation antipsychotics (N = 28), with polypharmacy common. The 2 treatment groups did not differ in baseline symptom profiles, with the exception of disorganized thinking, which was more severe in second-generation antipsychotic-treated adolescents. Twelve of the 48 adolescents (25%) developed a psychotic disorder, with all converters having been prescribed second-generation antipsychotics. There were no conversions among antidepressant-treated adolescents (log-rank chi(2) = 7.36, df = 1, p = .007). Treatment outcome, however, was confounded, since 11 of the 12 converters were nonadherent. Adolescents, in general, were more likely to be nonadherent to second-generation antipsychotics (61%, 17/28) than to antidepressants (20%, 4/20; chi(2) = 7.86, p = .005). Improvement in 3 of 5 positive symptoms over time was significant (p < .001) and similar for both medications. Disorganized thought, however, did not improve regardless of treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nonrandom assignment limits comparisons between antidepressants and anti-psychotics in this study. However, with follow-up, a number of adolescents meeting criteria for prodromal schizophrenia were successfully treated with antidepressants. At present, a substantial number of false positives among the antidepressant-treated subgroup cannot be ruled out. However, the findings suggest that, in some cases, it might be preferable to begin treatment with antidepressants and progress to antipsychotics once symptoms intensify, since adherence to the latter is difficult to maintain.

PMID:
17474810
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Allen Press, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk