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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2007 May 1;230(9):1324-8.

Surgical correction of brachycephalic syndrome in dogs: 62 cases (1991-2004).

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  • 1MedVet and Associates Ltd, 300 E Wilson Bridge Rd, Columbus, OH 43085, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess results of surgical correction of brachycephalic syndrome (including stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules) in dogs and determine whether dogs with hypoplastic trachea have a less favorable long-term outcome.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS:

62 dogs with brachycephalic syndrome.

PROCEDURES:

Medical records from 1991 to 2004 were reviewed for information regarding signalment, clinical signs, diagnosis, surgery, and long-term outcome. Surgical outcome was rated by owners as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Common abnormalities, treatments, and long-term outcomes among the 62 dogs were assessed.

RESULTS:

Predominantly affected breeds included English Bulldog, Pug, and Boston Terrier. Elongated soft palate was the most common abnormality (54/62 [87.1%] dogs); the most common combination of abnormalities was elongated soft palate, stenotic nares, and everted saccules (16/62 [25.8%] dogs). The English Bulldog was the most common breed for all abnormalities, including elongated soft palate (27/54 [50%] dogs), stenotic nares (14/36 [38.9%] dogs), everted saccules (20/36 [55.6%] dogs), hypoplastic trachea (7/13 [53.9%] dogs), and laryngeal collapse (2/5 [40%]). No dogs had everted saccules alone. Outcome did not differ between dogs under-going staphylectomy by use of laser or scissor resection. Follow-up information was obtained for 34 dogs; 16 (47.1%) had an excellent outcome, and 16 (47.1%) had a good outcome. Overall treatment success rate was 94.2%, and overall mortality rate was 3.2%.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Surgical treatment of brachycephalic syndrome in dogs appeared to be associated with a favorable long-term outcome, regardless of age, breed, specific diagnoses, or number and combinations of diagnoses.

PMID:
17472557
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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