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Ann Plast Surg. 2007 May;58(5):536-40.

Efficacy of negative pressure therapy to enhance take of 1-stage allodermis and a split-thickness graft.

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  • 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Negative pressure therapy has been used in various conditions to promote wound healing. It has also been used to secure a skin graft by improving microcirculation and providing tight adhesion between the graft and the recipient bed. The authors coupled the idea of negative pressure therapy for 1-stage allodermis and a split-thickness skin graft. This prospective study presents 47 cases of skin defects treated by 1-stage allodermis and a split-thickness skin graft. The patients were divided into 2 groups either treated with simultaneous aid of negative pressure therapy for 5 days (group 1, n = 37) or a classic tieover dressing (group 2, n = 10). In group 1, 97.8% graft take was noted at day 5 and the mean time until complete healing was 5.8 days. In group 2, 84% graft take was noted at day 5 and mean time until complete healing was 8.9 days with an average number of 3.2 dressings. Statistically significant graft take (day 5) and time until complete healing was noted (P < 0.05). Good aesthetic and functional result mimicking a full-thickness skin graft was achieved in both groups. However, frequent dressings, longer time to heal, and more restriction to the graft site were needed for group 2. Split-thickness skin added to allodermis provided a sufficient amount of dermis to prevent contracture, and the negative pressure therapy ensured fast and complete take of the 2-layered composite graft. This option can be used to achieve healing mimicking a full-thickness skin graft without requiring large full-thickness donor sites.

PMID:
17452839
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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