Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Cell Biol. 2007 Apr 23;177(2):231-42.

Three microtubule severing enzymes contribute to the "Pacman-flux" machinery that moves chromosomes.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.

Abstract

Chromosomes move toward mitotic spindle poles by a Pacman-flux mechanism linked to microtubule depolymerization: chromosomes actively depolymerize attached microtubule plus ends (Pacman) while being reeled in to spindle poles by the continual poleward flow of tubulin subunits driven by minus-end depolymerization (flux). We report that Pacman-flux in Drosophila melanogaster incorporates the activities of three different microtubule severing enzymes, Spastin, Fidgetin, and Katanin. Spastin and Fidgetin are utilized to stimulate microtubule minus-end depolymerization and flux. Both proteins concentrate at centrosomes, where they catalyze the turnover of gamma-tubulin, consistent with the hypothesis that they exert their influence by releasing stabilizing gamma-tubulin ring complexes from minus ends. In contrast, Katanin appears to function primarily on anaphase chromosomes, where it stimulates microtubule plus-end depolymerization and Pacman-based chromatid motility. Collectively, these findings reveal novel and significant roles for microtubule severing within the spindle and broaden our understanding of the molecular machinery used to move chromosomes.

PMID:
17452528
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2064132
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk