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Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Apr;115(4):592-8. Epub 2007 Jan 17.

Perinatal bisphenol A exposure increases estrogen sensitivity of the mammary gland in diverse mouse strains.

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  • 1Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies of low-dose effects of xenoestrogens have yielded conflicting results that may be attributed to differences in estrogen sensitivity between the rodent strains examined. Perinatal exposure of CD-1 mice to low doses of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA) alters peripubertal mammary gland development. Future studies to assess the role of estrogen receptors as mediators of BPA action require estrogen receptor knock-out mice that were generated on a C57Bl6 background. The sensitivity of the C57Bl6 strain to estradiol and BPA is unknown.

OBJECTIVES:

In the present study we examined whether the mammary glands of CD-1 and C57Bl6 mice exhibited similar responses to 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) and whether perinatal exposure to BPA equally enhanced sensitivity of the mammary glands to E(2) at puberty.

METHODS:

Immature mice were ovariectomized and treated for 10 days with one of eight doses of E(2). Morphological mammary gland parameters were examined to identify doses producing half-maximal effects. Mice were exposed perinatally to 0 or 250 ng BPA/kg body weight (bw)/day from gestational day 8 until postnatal day (PND) 2. On PND25, female offspring were ovariectomized and given an estrogen challenge of 0, 0.5, or 1 microg E(2)/kg bw/day for 10 days. Morphometric parameters of the mammary gland were compared between strains.

RESULTS:

Both strains exhibited similar responses to E(2). Perinatal BPA exposure altered responses to E(2) at puberty for several parameters in both strains, although the effect in CD-1 was slightly more pronounced.

CONCLUSION:

Both mouse strains provide adequate models for the study of perinatal exposure to xenoestrogens.

PMID:
17450229
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1852652
Free PMC Article
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