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Med Hypotheses. 2007;69(4):821-5. Epub 2007 Apr 19.

Nitric oxide synthase partial uncoupling as a key switching mechanism for the NO/ONOO- cycle.

Author information

  • School of Molecular Biosciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4234, USA. martin_pall@wsu.edu

Abstract

Short-term stressors, capable of increasing nitric oxide levels, act to initiate cases of illnesses including chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivity, fibromyalgia and posttraumatic stress disorder. These stressors, acting primarily through the nitric oxide product, peroxynitrite, are thought to initiate a complex vicious cycle mechanism, known as the NO/ONOO- cycle that is responsible for chronic illness. The complexity of the NO/ONOO- cycle raises the question as to whether the mechanism that switches on this cycle is this complex cycle itself or whether a simpler mechanism is the primary switch. It is proposed here that the switch involves a combination of two variable switches, the increase of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and the partial uncoupling of the NOS activity, with uncoupling caused by a tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency. NOS uncoupling causes the NOS enzymes to produce superoxide, the other precursor of peroxynitrite, in place of nitric oxide. Thus partial uncoupling will cause NOS proteins to act like peroxynitrite synthases, leading, in turn to increased NF-kappaB activity. Peroxynitrite is known to oxidize BH4, and consequently partial uncoupling may initiate a vicious cycle, propagating the partial uncoupling over time. The combination of high NOS activity and BH4 depletion will lead to a potential vicious cycle that may be expected to switch on the larger NO/ONOO- cycle, thus producing the symptoms and signs of chronic illness. The role of peroxynitrite in the NO/ONOO- cycle also implies that such uncoupling is part of the chronic phase cycle mechanism such that agents that lower uncoupling will be useful in treatment.

PMID:
17448611
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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