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Diabetes Educ. 2007 Mar-Apr;33(2):291-9.

Diabetes problem-solving scale development in an adult, African American sample.

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  • 1Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 2024 East Monument Street, Suite 2-600, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. fbriggs3@jhmi.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this pilot study was to examine psychometric properties of the Diabetes Problem-Solving Scale (DPSS), which was designed to assess how adults with type 2 diabetes approach and manage problems encountered in diabetes self-management.

METHODS:

Participants were 64 African American adults with type 2 diabetes. The 30-item DPSS and measures of social problem solving, diabetes self-management, and depressive symptoms were administered. Blood samples were collected to measure hemoglobin A1C level.

RESULTS:

Cronbach alpha for the DPSS total scale was .77 and ranged from .72 to .78 for subscales. Correlations of the DPSS total score and subscale scores with a standardized social problem-solving scale ranged from 0.30 to 0.46 (all P < .01). Higher DPSS total scores, indicating better self-reported diabetes problem solving, were associated with higher medication adherence, more frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose, and lower hemoglobin A1C level. Of the DPSS subscales, Impulsive Style, Negative Transfer of Past Experience/Learning, and Negative Motivation were differentially associated with reduced self-management and disease control.

CONCLUSION:

The DPSS demonstrated acceptable total scale and subscale internal consistency, construct validity, and predictive validity in this pilot sample. The scale may have utility both in identifying associations between diabetes-related problem solving and self-management and in guiding problem solving interventions to improve self-management and control.

PMID:
17426304
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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