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BMC Infect Dis. 2007 Mar 15;7:18.

Anticipated and current preventive behaviors in response to an anticipated human-to-human H5N1 epidemic in the Hong Kong Chinese general population.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, School of Public Health, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong, China. jlau@cuhk.edu.hk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of self-reported preventive behaviors in response to an anticipated local human-to-human H5N1 transmission outbreak and factors associated with such behaviors have not been examined.

METHODS:

A random, anonymous, cross-sectional telephone survey of 503 Hong Kong Chinese adults.

RESULTS:

The public in Hong Kong is likely to adopt self-protective behaviors (e.g., wearing face mask in public venues (73.8%), increasing the frequency of handwashing (86.7%)) and behaviors that protect others (e.g., wearing face masks when experiencing influenza-like illness (ILI, 92.4%), immediately seeking medical consultation (94.2%), making declarations when crossing the border with ILI (87.1%), complying to quarantine policies (88.3%)). Multivariate analyses indicated that factors related to age, full-time employment, perceived susceptibility, perceived efficacy of preventive measures, perceived higher fatality as compared to SARS, perceived chance of a major local outbreak, and being worried about self/family members contracting the virus were significantly associated with the inclination to adopt self-protective measures. Similar analyses showed that education level, variables related to perceived efficacy, perceived major local outbreak and such were significantly associated with various behaviors directed towards protecting others.

CONCLUSION:

In the event of a human-to-human H5N1 outbreak, the public in Hong Kong is likely to adopt preventive measures that may help contain the spread of the virus in the community.

PMID:
17359545
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1845150
Free PMC Article
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