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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008 Feb;62(2):171-7. Epub 2007 Mar 14.

Relationship between meat intake and the development of acute coronary syndromes: the CARDIO2000 case-control study.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition - Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between meat consumption and the prevalence of a first, non-fatal event of an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), in a Greek sample.

DESIGN:

Randomized, case-control study.

SETTING:

Tertiary care.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 848 out of 956 patients who had been randomly selected from hospitals with first event of an ACS and 1078 population-based controls, age and sex matched.

INTERVENTIONS:

Detailed information regarding their medical records, alcohol intake, physical activity and smoking habits was recorded. Nutritional habits were evaluated with a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis estimated the odds ratio of having ACS by level of meat intake, after taking into account several confounders.

RESULTS:

Patients consumed higher quantities of meat compared with controls (6.5+/-2.9 vs 4.9+/-2.1 portions per month, P<0.001). Food-specific analysis showed that red meat consumption was strongly associated with 52% increased odds of ACS (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47-1.58). On the contrary, white meat consumption seems to be associated with only 18% likelihood of having cardiac events (95% CI 1.11-1.26). Participants who consumed >8 portions red meat and >12 portions white meat per month had 4.9 times and 3.7 higher odds of having ACS, respectively (P<0.001), compared with low meat intake (<4 portions and <8 portions per month, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased red meat consumption showed a strong positive association with cardiac disease risk, whereas white meat consumption showed less prominent results, after controlling for several potential confounding factors.

PMID:
17356558
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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