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Acta Derm Venereol. 2007;87(2):135-9.

Study of psychological stress, sebum production and acne vulgaris in adolescents.

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  • 1Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA. gyosipov@wfubmc.edu

Abstract

Sebum production is thought to play a major role in acne vulgaris in adolescents. Psychological stress may exacerbate acne; however, it is not known whether the perceived association between stress and acne exacerbation is due to increased sebum production. The aims of this study were to determine: (i) if psychological stress in adolescents is associated with increased sebum production; and (ii) if stress is associated with increased acne severity independent of, or in conjunction with, increased sebum production. Ninety-four secondary school students in Singapore (mean age 14.9 years) were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. During a high stress condition (prior to mid-year examinations) and a low stress condition (during the summer holidays), the following were evaluated: (i) self-reported stress level using the Perceived Stress Scale; (ii) sebum level at baseline and at 1 h; and (iii) acne severity. The prevalence of self-reported acne in this study population was high (95% in males and 92% in females). Most subjects had mild to moderate acne. Sebum measurements did not differ significantly between the high stress and low stress conditions. For the study population as a whole, we observed a statistically significant positive correlation (r=0.23, p=0.029) between stress levels and severity of acne papulopustulosa. In adolescents, psychological stress does not appear to affect the quantity of sebum production. The study suggests a significant association between stress and severity of acne papulopustulosa, especially in males. Increased acne severity associated with stress may result from factors other than sebum quantity.

PMID:
17340019
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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