Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
J Neurol. 2007 Feb;254(2):160-8.

Antimyelin antibodies in clinically isolated syndromes correlate with inflammation in MRI and CSF.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the correlation of antimyelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-(anti-MOG) and anti-myelin basic protein antibodies (anti-MBP) in serum of CIS patients with inflammatory signs in MRI and in CSF and, as previously suggested,the incidence of more frequent and rapid progression to clinically definite MS (CDMS).

METHODS:

133CIS patients were analysed for anti-MOG and anti-MBP (Western blot). Routine CSF and cranial MRI (quantitatively and qualitatively) measures were analyzed. 55 patients had a follow-up of at least 12 months or until conversion to CDMS.

RESULTS:

Patients with anti-MOG and anti-MBP had an increased intrathecal IgG production and CSF white blood cell count(p = 0.048 and p = 0.036). When anti-MBP alone, or both antibodies were present the cranial MRI showed significantly more T2 lesions (p = 0.007 and p = 0.01,respectively). There was a trend for more lesion dissemination in anti-MBP positive patients (p = 0.076).Conversely, anti-MOG- and/or anti-MBP failed to predict conversion to CDMS in our follow-up group (n = 55). Only in female patients with at least one MRI lesion (n = 34) did the presence of anti-MOG correlate with more frequent (p = 0.028) and more rapid (p = 0.0209) transition to CDMS.

CONCLUSIONS:

Presence of anti-MOG or anti-MBP or both was not significantly associated with conversion to CDMS in our CIS cohort. However, patients with anti-MOG and anti-MBP had higher lesion load and more disseminated lesions in cranial MRI as well as higher values for CSF leucocytes and intrathecal IgG production. Our data support a correlation of anti-MOG and anti-MBP to inflammatory signs in MRI and CSF. The prognostic value of these antibodies for CDMS, however, seems to be less pronounced than previously reported.

PMID:
17334662
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk