Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2007 May-Jun;14(3):288-94. Epub 2007 Feb 28.

Measuring clinical information technology in the ICU setting: application in a quality improvement collaborative.

Author information

  • 1Medicine Services, Parkland Health & Hospital System, Dallas, TX 75235, USA. ramara@parknet.pmh.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Few instruments are available to measure the performance of intensive care unit (ICU) clinical information systems. Our objectives were: 1) to develop a survey-based metric that assesses the automation and usability of an ICU's clinical information system; 2) to determine whether higher scores on this instrument correlate with improved outcomes in a multi-institution quality improvement collaborative.

DESIGN:

This is a cross-sectional study of the medical directors of 19 Michigan ICUs participating in a state-wide quality improvement collaborative designed to reduce the rate of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI). Respondents completed a survey assessing their ICU's information systems.

MEASUREMENTS:

The mean of 54 summed items on this instrument yields the clinical information technology (CIT) index, a global measure of the ICU's information system performance on a 100 point scale. The dependent variable in this study was the rate of CRBSI after the implementation of several evidence-based recommendations. A multivariable linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the CIT score and the post-intervention CRBSI rates after adjustment for the pre-intervention rate.

RESULTS:

In this cross-sectional analysis, we found that a 10 point increase in the CIT score is associated with 4.6 fewer catheter related infections per 1,000 central line days for ICUs who participate in the quality improvement intervention for 1 year (95% CI: 1.0 to 8.0).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study presents a new instrument to examine ICU information system effectiveness. The results suggest that the presence of more sophisticated information systems was associated with greater reductions in the bloodstream infection rate.

PMID:
17329726
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2244889
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk