Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2007 Mar;48(3):1212-8.

Erythropoietin promotes survival of retinal ganglion cells in DBA/2J glaucoma mice.

Author information

  • 1(OSI) Eyetech, Inc., Lexington, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss occurs in response to increased intraocular pressure (IOP) and/or retinal ischemia in glaucoma and leads to impairment of vision. This study was undertaken to test the efficacy of erythropoietin (EPO) in providing neuroprotection to RGCs in vivo.

METHODS:

The neuroprotective effects of EPO were studied in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with control substances or various doses of EPO, starting at the age of 6 months and continuing for an additional 2, 4, or 6 months. RGCs were labeled retrogradely by a gold tracer. IOP was measured with a microelectric-mechanical system, and EPO receptor (EPOR) expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. Axonal death in the optic nerve was quantified by para-phenylenediamine staining, and a complete blood count system was used to measure the number of erythrocytes.

RESULTS:

In DBA/2J mice, the average number of viable RGCs significantly decreased from 4 months to 10 months, with an inverse correlation between the number of dead optic nerve axons and viable RGCs. Treatment with EPO at doses of 3000, 6000, and 12,000 U/kg body weight per week all prevented significant RGC loss, compared with untreated DBA/2J control animals. EPO effects were similar to those of memantine, a known neuroprotective agent. IOP, in contrast, was unchanged by both EPO and memantine. Finally, EPOR was expressed in the RGC layer in both DBA/2J and C57BL/6J mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

EPO promoted RGC survival in DBA/2J glaucomatous mice without affecting IOP. These results suggest that EPO may be a potential therapeutic neuroprotectant in glaucoma.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk