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Sangyo Eiseigaku Zasshi. 2007 Jan;49(1):21-6.

[Antibody titers against measles, rubella, mumps and varicella-zoster viruses in medical students].

[Article in Japanese]

Author information

  • 1Institute of Health and Sports Sciences, Kurume University, Mii-machi, Kurume, Japan. yosida-noriko@kurume-u.ac.jp

Abstract

It is important to identify and immunize susceptible students who have clinical practice to prevent and control hospital infections. The antibody titers to measles, rubella, mumps and varicella viruses were measured in 1,139 students(417 men, 722 women, average age 21.3+/-2.7 yr old)including 510 medical students, 442 nursing students and 187 students of the School of Medical Technology in Kurume University. Antibodies against measles virus were detected by particle agglutination assay(PA), those against rubella virus by hemagglutination inhibition assay(HI), and those against mumps and varicella viruses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(EIA). The serological susceptibilities to measles, rubella, mumps and varicella viruses were 112(9.8%), 112(9.8%), 163(14.3%)and 73(6.4%), respectively. The serological susceptibilities to measles, rubella and mumps viruses in male students were not different from those in female students. The susceptibility to varicella virus in female students was significantly higher than that in male students. After susceptible students were recommended to have vaccinations against each virus, the vaccination rate of the students without antibody was 99.1%. The history of infection and vaccination against the viruses were examined by self-recorded questionnaires in 406 students from all disciplines. The serological susceptibility of students with positive vaccination history was 11.1% for measles, 6.8% for rubella, 18.3% for mumps, and 4.9% for varicella. The serological susceptibility of students with a positive infection history was 5.7% for measles, 3.4% for rubella, 2.9% for mumps, and 4.9% for varicella. In the self-recorded questionnaire, the rate of unknown infection and vaccination histories were 57.5% and 71.6% for measles, 52.5% and 68.4% for rubella, 34.3% and 75.6% for mumps, and 27.1% and 80.5% for varicella, respectively. In conclusion, these data confirm that it is essential to assess immune status against measles, rubella, mumps and varicella in students who have clinical practice in hospital regardless of infection or vaccination history. Accordingly, susceptible students should be vaccinated to prevent those viral infections in hospital.

PMID:
17303935
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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