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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007 Jun 15;89(1):74-81. Epub 2007 Feb 8.

Illicit drug use, depression and their association with highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive women.

Author information

  • 1Center on Mental Health Services Research and Policy, Department of Psychiatry M/C 912, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1601 W. Taylor Street M/C 912, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. cook@ripco.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We examined the interaction of illicit drug use and depressive symptoms, and how they affect the subsequent likelihood of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use among women with HIV/AIDS.

METHODS:

Subjects included 1710 HIV-positive women recruited from six sites in the U.S. including Brooklyn, Bronx, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco/Bay Area, and Washington, DC. Cases of probable depression were identified using depressive symptom scores on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Crack, cocaine, heroin, and amphetamine use were self-reported at 6-month time intervals. We conducted multivariate random logistic regression analysis of data collected during 16 waves of semiannual interviews conducted from April 1996 through March 2004.

RESULTS:

We found an interaction effect between illicit drug use and depression that acted to suppress subsequent HAART use, controlling for virologic and immunologic indicators, socio-demographic variables, time, and study site.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study to document the interactive effects of drug use and depressive symptoms on reduced likelihood of HAART use in a national cohort of women. Since evidence-based behavioral health and antiretroviral therapies for each of these three conditions are now available, comprehensive HIV treatment is an achievable public health goal.

PMID:
17291696
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4009351
Free PMC Article

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