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Ann Pharmacother. 2007 Feb;41(2):185-92. Epub 2007 Feb 6.

Implementation of a weight management pharmaceutical care service.

Author information

  • 1Auburn University Pharmaceutical Care Center, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA. lloydkb@auburn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity, a national epidemic, is one of the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in the US. Pharmacists can play an integral role in weight management. Offering weight management services provides an opportunity to increase public awareness of pharmaceutical care and attract patients to pharmacy programs.

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the implementation and evaluate outcomes of a weight management pharmaceutical care service in a stand alone pharmaceutical care center on a college campus.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of data was conducted on 289 patient charts to evaluate the change in weight, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, and weight-related health conditions in patients who participated in the Healthy Habits program.

RESULTS:

The net change (change in values observed from first to last appointment) in weight was a loss of 1021.8 kg. The maximum weight change (change seen from the first appointment to the lowest value obtained during the program) was a loss of 1530.5 kg. These values correspond to a net mean weight loss of 3.6 kg per patient (10% of baseline weight) and a maximum mean weight loss per patient of 5.5 kg (15% of baseline weight). Eighty-three patients were able to decrease their BMI category and 76 patients had a decrease in risk status from baseline.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Auburn University Pharmaceutical Care Center's Healthy Habits program has been successful in helping patients decrease total body weight, BMI, and risk of weight-related complications. In addition, the program has increased the opportunity to identify other pharmaceutical care needs of patients and help establish the role of pharmacists in the management of obesity.

PMID:
17284503
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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