Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;20(2):143-6.

Are somatoform disorders 'mental disorders'? A contribution to the current debate.

Author information

  • 1Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany. rief@staff.uni-marburg.de

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

During the last 2 years, a debate has started over whether the somatoform symptoms/medically unexplained symptoms are wrongly placed under the category of mental disorders (section F in International classification of diseases-10 and in Diagnostic and statistical manual for mental disorders-IV).

RECENT FINDINGS:

Most experts on medically unexplained symptoms agree that there is a substantial need for revision of the diagnoses of somatoform disorders. While some authors suggest moving the somatoform disorders from axis I to axis III, others suggest improving the classification of these syndromes on axis I, such as by using empirically derived criteria and by introducing psychological descriptors which justify the categorization as a mental disorder. In contrast to the situation when the last version of Diagnostic and statistical manual for mental disorders was published, new empirical data has shown some psychological and behavioural characteristics of patients with somatoform symptoms. These and other empirically founded approaches can be landmarks for the revision of this section in Diagnostic and statistical manual for mental disorders-V and International classification of diseases-11.

SUMMARY:

The classification of somatoform disorders as 'mental disorders' could be justified if empirically founded psychological and behavioural characteristics are included into the classification process. Attention focusing, symptom catastrophizing, and symptom expectation are outlined as possible examples of involved psychological processes.

PMID:
17278912
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk