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Transfus Med. 2007 Feb;17(1):1-15.

A survey of the demographics of blood use.

Author information

  • 1Department of Haematology and Genetics, South Eastern Area Laboratory Services, Sydney, Australia. tjcobain@bigpond.net.au

Abstract

Epidemiological information was obtained by a series of questions to experts in the field of epidemiology of transfusion from the United States, England, Australia and Denmark. Although it became clear that the methods for collecting the data had differed between the countries, useful information was obtained for all questions. The data highlighted some major differences between the countries: the incident rate for red cell transfusion varied from 44.7 to 54.1 units, for platelets from 2.0 to 6.0 units and for plasma from 4.8 to 13.8 units transfused per 1000 population per year. Age and sex distribution of transfused patients was similar in all countries. Most of the red cell products are transfused to older recipients, and the distribution between men and women is approximately equal. The distribution for platelets is over a wider age range, and the difference between men and women is marked, with men predominating in all countries. The distribution for plasma is also directed to the elderly, and there is a predominance of men. The relationship between the disease or surgical procedure and the use of blood products was similar between countries. The use of red cells in cardiovascular surgery predominated. Neoplasms and digestive disorders were also prevalent. Neoplasms, including those relating to haematology, were the main use for platelets, but cardiovascular surgery was also important. In all countries, plasma is largely used in cardiovascular surgery. Two countries provided data relating to the number of units per transfusion episode including information relating to massive transfusion. In Australia, red cell use of >or=50 units per episode was largely associated with multiple traumas. In Denmark, it was associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and various medical requests.

PMID:
17266700
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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