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J Clin Oncol. 2007 Mar 20;25(9):1061-6. Epub 2007 Jan 29.

Physical activity, body mass index, and mammographic density in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. melinda.irwin@yale.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the association between physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and mammographic density in a racially/ethnically diverse population-based sample of 522 postmenopausal women diagnosed with stage 0-IIIA breast cancer and enrolled in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle Study.

METHODS:

We collected information on BMI and physical activity during a clinic visit 2 to 3 years after diagnosis. Weight and height were measured in a standard manner. Using an interview-administered questionnaire, participants recalled the type, duration, and frequency of physical activities they had performed in the last year. We estimated dense area and percentage density as a continuous measure using a computer-assisted software program from mammograms imaged approximately 1 to 2 years after diagnosis. Analysis of covariance methods were used to obtain mean density across WHO BMI categories and physical activity tertiles adjusted for confounders.

RESULTS:

We observed a statistically significant decline in percentage density (P for trend = .0001), and mammographic dense area (P for trend = .0052), with increasing level of BMI adjusted for potential covariates. We observed a statistically significant decline in mammographic dense area (P for trend = .036) with increasing level of sports/recreational physical activity in women with a BMI of at least 30 kg/m2. Conversely, in women with a BMI less than 25 kg/m2, we observed a non-statistically significant increase in mammographic dense area and percentage density with increasing level of sports/recreational physical activity.

CONCLUSION:

Increasing physical activity among obese postmenopausal breast cancer survivors may be a reasonable intervention approach to reduce mammographic density.

PMID:
17261853
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3839099
Free PMC Article
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